Using Fiction to Tell the Truth about History

How do you use historical and speculative fiction to tell the truth when America has fabricated its own fictions about its history, and particularly its ongoing racial inequities, for centuries? Bethany C. Morrow--one of USA Today’s “100 Black novelists and fiction writers you should read” and the indie bestselling author of the novels Mem, A Song Below Water, and the upcoming So Many Beginnings: A Little Women Remix--discusses with Eve and Julie the challenges that stem from blending “history” with mythology, the limitations a biased education imposes on our perspectives and imaginations, and the process of remixing a literary classic to incorporate Black characters. Bethany also recalls seeing herself reflected in fiction for the first time.




Mem, A Song Below Water


Buzzfeed's #1 Book to Read this Spring

A Best Book of the Month at The Washington Post, Bustle, and Chicago Review of Books


So Many Beginnings: A Little Women Remix


"Morrow’s ability to take the lingering stain of slavery on American history and use it as a catalyst for unbreakable love and resilience is flawless. That she has remixed a canonical text to do so only further illuminates the need to critically question who holds the pen in telling our nation’s story." ―Booklist, starred review



Go Deeper

Bethany C. Morrow

A Song Below Water, by Bethany C. Morrow

Mem, by Bethany C. Morrow

So Many Beginnings: A Little Women Remix, by Bethany C. Morrow

Take the Mic: Fictional Stories of Everyday Resistance, by Bethany C. Morrow and Yamile Saied Méndez

USA Today’s list of 100 Black novelists and fiction writers you should read

Lois Lane novels, by Gwenda Bond

Little Women (1994 movie starring Winona Ryder)

The 1619 Project

The Tiffany Dilemma

Margaret Atwood

Toni Morrison

“Why We Need Real Black Characters By Real Black Artists,” by Bethany C. Morrow, published on Medium

Eve Yohalem

Julie Sternberg

Book Dreams Podcast

Podglomerate

Lit Hub Radio